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Welfare Fraud

Welfare Fraud Reporting and Determining Welfare Fraud

Welfare Fraud Reporting and Determining Welfare Fraud

One of the most effective ways in reporting welfare fraud is to contact your nearest welfare agency. Depending on the state, there may even be a hot line where you can call and report it (you may also choose to do this anonymously). It is important to know the facts (i.e. person’s full name, when the fraud started happening, place of residence, place of employment, etc.) before you report the person(s) to fraud investigators.
Many states even have their own units or Department of Social Services that contain fraud investigators that they can utilize.  Federal fraud investigations can be conducted by the FBI, however, not every case of welfare fraud will require FBI involvement. The United Council on Welfare Fraud will also accept reports of suspected welfare fraud. They also have their own team of investigators to conduct a fraud investigation. The United Council on Welfare Fraud is also made up of law enforcement officials that can assist in the fraud investigation process.
The Health of Human Services Committee can also: monitor payments of welfare checks in an effort to prevent welfare fraud, develop a reporting system to help minimize welfare fraud, help to create new ways of preventing welfare fraud, access information from the Department of Social Services, and to determine how much taxpayers pay toward welfare.  In most cases of welfare fraud, detection is first determined by a district attorney and the Department of Social Services.

Welfare Fraud Background At A Glance

Welfare Fraud Background At A GlanceWelfare fraud costs the US
government millions of dollars in losses annually. Some states have even issued
awards to those who wish to come forward to report welfare benefits fraud.
Welfare fraud is executed when a criminal gives false reporting


The federal government and law enforcement officials have banned together to
create the “United Council on Welfare Fraud”. The United Council on
Welfare Fraud is made of investigators, administrators,  eligibility
workers, and claims writers from local, state, and federal agencies. The United
Council on Welfare Fraud also promotes awareness of welfare benefits fraud,
investigates welfare benefits fraud, prosecutes those who commit welfare fraud,
and trains people on how to investigate welfare fraud. Their CWFI (Certified
Welfare Fraud Investigation) program is open to people who want to be certified
as a welfare fraud investigator. The UCWF also supports the State Welfare Fraud
Directors. The State Welfare Fraud Directors meet a couple times a year to
discusses the issues regarding welfare fraud and possible solutions.

Easy To Read Welfare Fraud Examples

Easy To Read Welfare Fraud Examples

There are a number of ways for welfare disability fraud to be executed. Criminals will go as far as to lie or even make up the existence of a family member or their own identity in order to commit disability fraud. Below are examples of common ways that welfare disability fraud is committed.
         a parent is not residing at a house when they actually are.
         False reporting
         False claims by a parent or childcare provider in order to commit disability fraud.
         Failure to report drug related convictions when applying for welfare benefits.
         Not reporting a felony arrest or arrest warrant when applying for welfare benefits.
         Failure to adhere to probation terms while receiving welfare benefits.
         Purposely not reporting income/employment.
         Not disclosing personal assets.
         Not disclosing other assistant programs currently being utilized (i.e. section 8, unemployment benefits, social security, etc.).
         Claiming welfare assistance under a fake or false alias.
Statistically speaking, the most common form of welfare disability fraud is committed when an individual fails to report unemployment.
One of the biggest cases of welfare fraud occurred in Los Angeles County when a woman named Barbara Williams was found guilty of welfare fraud. She had used at least seven different aliases and claimed about thirty-four children over the coarse of seven years. She had collected approximately $239,000.00 in welfare checks and $50,000.00 worth of food stamps. An anonymous tip eventually led to her arrest. Barbara Williams was sentenced to eight years in prison.
Another example of a case involving welfare disability fraud, was in regards to Dorothy Woods. She cheated the government out of almost $300,000.00. One of the odd variables about this case was that Dorothy Woods was said to be pretty well-off before claiming welfare benefits.

Welfare Fraud False Reporting At A Glance

Welfare Fraud False Reporting At A Glance

Depending on the number of times false reporting has occurred, penalties can vary for benefit fraud according to state. Benefit fraud is considered a federal offense and can carry with it serious forms of punishment. In an attempt to violate the welfare system, courts will often sentence the guilty party to restitution, fines, probation, community service, or incarceration.
Another penalty, that will most likely be endured as a direct result of benefit fraud, will be loss of future benefits depending on how many violations were committed. Determining the length of time that the benefits will be suspended will also depend on how many past convictions of benefit fraud the criminal has been sentenced to.

Welfare Frauds At A Glance

Welfare Frauds At A Glance

In the United States, a welfare system has been established to provide struggling individuals with the financial assistance that they need to survive. However, some people have discovered ways to take advantage of this system and obtain government funds when they are able to earn an income.
When individuals take advantage of the welfare system in this manner, it is known as welfare fraud. Welfare fraud is a serious criminal offense, and therefore, it can be addressed with a criminal conviction and criminal sentencing. The penalties for welfare fraud vary from one state to another. It is possible for an individual to be incarcerated as punishment for welfare fraud.
However, more commonly, an individual will be placed on probation and he/she will be required to pay restitution fines for his/her actions. The required restitution payments may total a significant amount of money, and therefore, may cause financial stress for the offender.